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Morning Workshop Session
11:00am - 12:30pm

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(A1) Do I See What You See? Cortical Visual Impairment Characteristics and Intervention

(A2) FULL - Transition to Adult Services - FULL

(A3) FULL - Everyday Literacy: Reading and writing at home with less stress and more joy - FULL

(A4) How to Help Youth with Disabilities Get Their First Job!

(A5) FULL - An Integrative Approach to Autism Treatment - FULL

(A6) FULL - The Top 5 IEP Mistakes and How to Avoid Them - FULL

(A7) What Parents Need to Know about Adapted Physical Education

(A8) What Happens When You and Your School Just Can’t Agree? Using Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to Repair Relationships and Find Student-Centered Resolutions.

(A9) Conservatorships and What You Need to Know

(A10) Bullying: Parents’ Rights and School Districts’ Responsibilities

(A11) Period Problems and Problem Periods: What you can do to help your daughter manage “that time of the month”

(A12) Find your voice! How to Advocate for Your Rights and Needs with Policy Makers & Elected Officials

(A13) ABLE Accounts: Understanding Them and Using Them

(A14) FULL - Transforming Tears and Tantrums—Guiding children through the emotional storms of growing up - FULL

(A1) Do I See What You See? Cortical Visual Impairment Characteristics and Intervention

Jennifer McDonald-Peltier MS, ATP, AT Specialist, Center for Accessible Technology
We hear students described as having CVI, but what does that really mean? Learn the characteristics of CVI, including what's really happening when a student's vision seems to change frequently. Then learn strategies and supports to accommodate these students' visual access needs, and potentially improve their ability to visually identify and connect with the people and activities in their environments.


FULL - (A2) Transition to Adult Services - FULL

Representatives from Support for Families, Department of Rehabilitation, The Arc San Francisco, Golden Gate Regional Center, Independent Living Resource Center San Francisco, Jewish Vocational Services, San Francisco Unified School District
Representatives from agencies that provide services to young adults and adults with disabilities will present an overview of their transition programs, including information on eligibility criteria and how to access services for youth ages 14 to 24.


(A3) Everyday Literacy: Reading and writing at home with less stress and more joy

Alexis Filippini, PhD, Executive Director, Building on the Best
Support your child's reading and writing development with less stress and more joy! Explore easy, fun ways to bring literacy into the family's everyday routines. This imaginative, interactive workshop is focused on beginning readers of any age. Families with special needs and non-English speaking families are especially welcome, though all families will discover new ideas.


(A4) How to Help Youth with Disabilities Get Their First Job!

Larry Robbin, Executive Director, Robbin and Associates
What can parents, program staff and other Adults do to help youth with disabilities get t heir first job? Learn the best practices and things to avoid as you help youth with disabilities in their job search. Get information about how employers really hire, customized employment, accommodations, helpful websites and resources that will help you play an appropriate role in helping these youth enter the world of work. If you want to improve employment opportunities for youth with disabilities. Do not miss this workshop!

fULL - (A5) An Integrative Approach to Autism Treatment - FULL

Sanford Newmark, MD, Director, Clinical Programs Head of Pediatric Integrative Neurodevelopmental Program, UCSF Osher Center
The old paradigm of autism as simply a brain disorder, amenable only to therapy, is being replaced with an integrative approach that recognizes autism as a syndrome that affects the entire person, with nutritional, gastrointestinal, metabolic, and immune aspects. As a result, newer bio-medical treatments that include dietary interventions, nutritional supplements, and others, are garnering positive results. There is a great deal of conflicting information on the internet, making it difficult for parents and professionals to know how to treat autistic children safely and effectively. In this talk, Dr. Sanford Newmark will discuss the latest information on biomedical treatment and give specific recommendations for the best and safest treatments.


FULL - (A6) The Top 5 IEP Mistakes and How to Avoid Them! - FULL

Jean Murrell Adams, Esq., Attorney, ADAMS ESQ
Attorney Jean Murrell Adams has analyze thousands of IEP’s over the years, in this workshop Mrs. Adams will help you identify the top five IEP mistakes and guide you on how you can avoid them.


(A7) What Parents Need to Know about Adapted Physical Education

Jihyun Lee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Erin Siebert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, San Jose State University, Kinesiology Department
This workshop will provide information on adapted physical education including what it is, who qualities, why it is important, and how to maximize the benefits of adapted physical activity. Collaborative team approach, transition planning, and developmentally appropriate practices will be discussed.


(A8) What Happens When You and Your School Just Can’t Agree? Using Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to repair relationships and find stu-dent-centered resolutions.

Ricki Jo Scott, Program Administrator for ADR, PD and Compliance, SFUSD; Margaret Farruggio, Director of Special Education, SFUSD; Mildred Browne, Ed.D. Educational Consultant, Ascendancy Solutions and Carole Conn, Director of the Public Service Programs, The Bar Association of San Francisco
In collaboration with The Bar Association of San Francis-co, SFUSD’s ADR program entails a 2-hour Collaborative Conference to confidentially discuss misunderstandings, disagreements, complaints, etc. This process is voluntary for our families and has been successful this year, beginning in October 2016. The goal is to come to an Agreement by working together to create a positive, peaceable approach to finding student-centered resolutions. Attend this session to view a role play of what happens at an ADR meeting and learn more about repairing relation-ships within Special Education Services and your school site.


(A9) Conservatorships and What You Need to Know

Alexis Lynch, Attorney, Law Office of Alexis Lynch
Conservatorship is an important step for some families of a child with special needs transitioning into adulthood. In order to maintain the legal rights to make important decisions concerning your child’s residence, medical treatment and education after age 18, you must be appointed conservator by a judge. This workshop will provide an overview of what conservatorship entails and the steps necessary for being appointed a conservator through the local courts.


(A10) Bullying: Parents’ Rights and School Districts’ Responsibilities

Attorneys from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights
Is your child a target of bullying, harassment or threats? Attorneys from Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights will present parents’ rights and school districts’ responsibilities under federal regulations regarding harassment by peers or school staff. The work-shop will focus on federal civil rights laws that prohibit harassment against students based on race, color, national origin, sex, or disability, and what you can do if your child is being harassed or bullied for any of these reasons.


(A11) Period Problems and Problem Periods: What you can do to help your daughter manage “that time of the month”

Erica Monasterio, Clinical Professor, UCSF
Young women with disabilities and their families struggle to manage the changes in mood and behavior and the discomfort that accompanies menstruation. Learn about managing the discomforts and inconveniences of monthly periods, the pros and cons of suppressing periods, and how to recognize what is normal and what may be a sign of a problem.


(A12) Find your voice! How to Advocate for Your Rights and Needs with Policy Makers & Elected Officials

Sheraden Nicholau, Regional Manager, CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities;
Would you like to be a stronger self-advocate who impacts policy decisions that affect your life? Or, would you like to better support the self-advocates in your life, in finding their strength? Learn about tools, tips and best-practices for advocating for your rights and needs with policy makers and with elected officials. This will assist you whether you advocating on a local level, a state level or a federal level. We are stronger together!


(A13) ABLE Accounts: Understanding Them and Using Them

Kevin Urbatsch, Attorney, The Urbatsch Law Firm P.C.
Persons with disabilities should know about ABLE. ABLE stands for Achieving a Better Life Experience and is a new type of bank account designed exclusively for people with disabilities. The assets in an ABLE account can grow in-come-tax free and will not interfere with that person’s essential public benefits, like SSI or Medi-Cal. Some of the other benefits of the ABLE account for a person with a disability is that they can manage their own money and save for big ticket items to make their lives better. There are some limitations including funding limits, eligibility restrictions, payback requirement, and limited distributions.


FULL - (A14) Transforming Tears and Tantrums—Guiding children through the emotional storms of growing up - FULL

Karen Wolfe, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, SF Bay Play Therapy
What if you had the tools to help turn emotional outbursts into healing moments for you and your child? This talk explains what goes on the brain and mind of a child who is stuck in their emotions and what you can do to help with the incredibly simple yet profound Hand in Hand Parenting tools. Transform the power struggles in everything from school refusal to morning routine woes, difficulty getting off devices, hearing no, and even ease bedtime fears in moments of connection, empathy, and trust.